Joyce DeWitt on Janet Wood:

"I loved her. I loved creating her and I loved doing her, because I thought she was a great girl. She was a young woman who had a strong commitment to personal integrity and a sense of morality, thought she had a handle on who she was, was sometimes confident and sometimes terrified, and was absolutely searching all the time in every direction. She was seeking to understand the world and everything about it. So she was willing to change and grow and try things and be flexible. And yet at the same time she had a great strength of character and was capable of being completely inflexible, which was a necessary ingredient for the type of comedy we were doing. And yet she had to be willing to jump off the high board before thinking to ask if there was water in the pool. I have her a lot of characteristics I have; not that I’m saying these are good characteristics to have.

Janet liked people, she liked herself. She wanted to be fair. She was very egalitarian. She didn’t support the idea of chauvinism or prejudice of any kind. She believed every person deserved a fair shot. And she was willing to give someone the benefit of the doubt until they proved to her that she really ought to get them out of her life. That was really the key to her being in that apartment. She would give them the benefit of the doubt every time, people who had crossed the line. Particularly with Jack - he was always crossing the line. Not that his heart was in the wrong place. She was very forgiving and accepting as well. And yet she had her own demons. She could be very stressed and difficult and harder on herself than anyone else. People reading this will say, ‘Hey, how’d she get all that? Janet was just nice and kind of funny on occasions.’ But as an actress, I had to know her and understand her motivations, and I did. That’s just the homework actors do.”

from Come and Knock on Our Door: A Hers and Hers and His Guide to Three’s Company

Anonymous: How do we navigate to the next page on your blog?

The picture of the trio at the beach, on the lower right hand corner there’s a white double arrow. :)

Richard Kline on Larry Dallas:

"Larry was the personification of a wet dream, basically. I think he was every guy without restraint who was irrevocably heterosexual and proved he could meet, greet, and bed women. This was a life task for him. Larry was a psychedelic offshoot of a Guys and Dolls character. A con artist with a heart of gold, as lovely Bernie [West] would describe him. I think he basically had a good heart. A lot of guys I would meet would say, ‘You got me in trouble because I modeled my character after you.’ I said, ‘Bad choice. Come on, show a little respect for women.’”

from Come and Knock on Our Door: A Hers and Hers and His Guide to Three’s Company

tvland:

We’ll be waiting for you at the Regal Beagle this weekend! 

tvland:

We’ll be waiting for you at the Regal Beagle this weekend! 

Priscilla Barnes on Terri Alden:

"Terri has several sides to her personality. On the job, she’s very straight, very competent, very professional. She changes after she comes home and takes off the uniform. She’s compulsive, a little wacko. She tries to say the right thing, but it comes out the wrong thing, at the wrong time. She’s a mess."

from Come and Knock on Our Door: A Hers and Hers and His Guide to Three’s Company

Jenilee Harrison on Cindy Snow:

"The producers made me the klutz, because they wanted my character different from Suzanne’s, who was a dumb blonde. Cindy wasn’t dumb - she started going to UCLA in the context of the show, she was smart - she was just klutzy. I wasn’t like that [klutzy] at all. I was acting. Her enthusiasm, likability, vulnerability, naïveté - all that was me."

from Come and Knock on Our Door: A Hers and Hers and His Guide to Three’s Company

Suzanne Somers on Chrissy Snow:

"The first time I came out [as Chrissy], it was the first time people had ever seen me, so I think people thought it was me. So I got very little recognition for the [acting] work I was doing because people thought I was that person. But I’m not that person. I understand her soul. I was that person as a little girl. And it was my choice to make her a woman-child, a child trapped in a woman’s body with all the naïveté and purity. Chrissy was totally unaware of everything around her.

What was easy about that character for me is she had a moral code. I kept saying to all the writers I worked with: ‘Help me finish the box; the box is the moral code of the character. What will she do and won’t she do? WIll she lie or won’t she lie? Is she manipulative or is she not?’ And I had the moral-code box of Chrissy filled; the edges were all filled in: What she would and wouldn’t do, what she would and wouldn’t say, what she would and wouldn’t tolerate, what she thought was right and wrong. Once the audience is locked into the moral code - they’re not aware that it’s called that - but once they sense the moral values of a character, then they anticipate what that character’s going to do before she even does it. The greatest feeling was in years three, four, and five, when I really had the character together, the audience would laugh before it happened. They totally understood her thought processes. Chrissy was a delicious character, and sometimes those only come around once in your career. It’s not that I haven’t been looking.”

from Come and Knock on Our Door: A Hers and Hers and His Guide to Three’s Company